Bce and ce dating - Common Era - Wikipedia


In regard to the use of BCE and CE, these are more recent developments.  In most usages, BCE stands for “Before the Common Era,” and CE stands for “Common Era.”  BCE is used in place of BC, and CE is used in place of AD.  The word “Common” in both instances refers to the date employed by the most commonly used calendar system, the Gregorian Calendar.  The years are the same, only the designations are different.  For example, 400 BCE is the same as 400 BC, and 2011 CE is the same as 2011 AD.  There is another less frequent meaning in use for the “C” in the new BCE and CE designations, in that the “C” stands for “Current,” the implication being that there is yet another era still to come.  Many Christians do not like either of these changes, but they can, of course, interpret the letter “C” in the BCE and CE designations as referring to “Christian” or “Christ’s” without taking offense in what many see as an attempt to delegitimize or eliminate Christ from the calendar.

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(for more information on how it spread read our article What Did We Use Before BC and AD ) The need for the introduction of the Gregorian Calendar came about because a year is not exactly 365 days long.  It is 365 and a quarter days long.  Every four years, March 1st moved behind a day until after centuries instead of being early spring March 1st was now the beginning of winter.  Something had to be done. The Gregorian Calendar was introduced in the Catholic parts of Europe in 1582 .  by Pope Gregory XIII (then the religious leader of the Roman Catholic faith). It was an improvement upon the Julian Calendar to keep the average length of the calendar year better in line with the seasons. Now here's a rule that will drive you crazy.  The rules, months, and days of the Gregorian calendar are the same as those of the Julian Calendar, except for the leap year rules. In the Gregorian calendar, a year is a leap year if the year number is evenly divisible by 4.  However century years follow a different rule. The number must be divisible by both 100 and 400 to be a leap year; otherwise it is not a leap year. For example, 1600 and 2000 are leap years, but 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not.


Bce and ce dating

Bce and ce dating